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be involved. france on the other hand -- france and spain leading the charge, saying that this must be done now. financial markets are being very good and not panicking, but if they see continued failure of eurozone finance ministers to agree to this, we might get the restoration of finance of duties, which of costa much trouble in recent years. the deadline for agreeing is no overarching bank advisory super body is meant to be in place on january 1. it does not look likely, and a lot of frustration at this meeting today with the sides deeply divided and no sign of agreement. that, of course, is the basic issue -- why has there not an overarching supervisory control? precisely because it was difficult to do then. the eurozone crisis highlighted that failure, and we've still got the same problems blighting the regular meetings of finance ministers. >> despite the eurozone crisis, german exports are still robust. >> we will have the latest on the german export data later on in the program, but first, in britain, the duchess of cambridge is said to be feeling a little bit better after spending
small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan will stick around. time to bring you today's global markets report. let's go to asia for the update. >> that upbeat pmi data failed to lift greater china markets. there is pessimism over general lack of policy and also fears that over 800 companies lining up for ipos could further drain liquidity out of the
in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want to draw your attention here. the ten-year gild in the u.k., 1.957%. extraordinary. we're not off the 2% market in the spread, widening significantly. coming up on the program today, the count is set to get underway in south korea following general elections. we'll head to seoul to find out whether the country could elect its first female leader. >>> the bank of england releases minutes from its latest polic
a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so for trading in asia, just how japan, china and the rest have been affected by fiscal cliff news, diedra morris is join onning us with plenty more. hi. >> hey, kelly. it was a bit of a rude awaking. a lot of these indexes were on their way to gains and then we had the fiscal cliff setback. we had news that john boehner's plan b failed. this all turned red and this is where we ended. the nikkei 225 coming back from that huge rally that we have seen over the last five weeks shedding 1%. the exporters hurt here because the dollar/yen was lower. it has regained some ground in the last few hours or so. the kospi shedding about
concerned about france and spain than i am about italy. >> we'll talk about those. >> let me add asking. if italy is in this situation now, it relied on the easy way out. and politicians, including berlusconi, didn't have the foresight to see that. >> thank you so much for coming by. >>> staying at the eurozone, investors will be watching for anything coming from the italian crisis. the results of the spanish bond actions are due around 12:40 cst. hsbc was hit with a $1.9 billion fine. the ceo said we accept responsibility for our mistakes and are profoundly sorry for them. >> a full year loft loss of 4.7 billion euros, thinksen krup has more details. >> they are starting to look at the positive of what i would call a -- strategy, i.e., a clean sweep when it comes to the business strategy of thyssenkrupp as well as the instruct occur and the refocusing on being transparent and definitely being something shareholders should trust. so no dividends, jobs may go and the sale of celiamerica being looked at. the cfo says there's a handful of interested parties in that particular party of the
for into religious and intercultural dialogue. the three founding nations -- saudi arabia, spain, and austria -- were represented by their foreign ministers. among the 600 guests was the united nations secretary- general. the saudi government provided some 15 million euros in funding for the dialogue center for the first three years. >> we are most grateful to his majesty for his farsighted decision to launch this important and timely initiative. austria is greatly honored at the center is established. >> a outside the palace, greens and liberal muslim protesters point out that even as saudi arabia promotes religious dialogue in vienna, and to commit human rights abuses at home. >> it is a shame and a disgrace for austria and spain to have provided the saudis a center like this as a platform for their views in europe and all the world. >> the center is headquartered in this palace in vienna. representatives of all the world religions are invited to come here and engage in constructive dialogue. critics are predicting endless rounds of unproductive chatter and worry that saudi arabia could indeed use
. >> it is a rare thing for you. hang around long enough, it will go your way. thanks for that. >> cheers. >>> spain. the treasury is setting up three, seven, and ten-year bonds. they're now pre-funding for 2013. we've got the results of that in around about 30 minutes. >>> and china and india secretary growth slowed in november. analysts say china and india's nonmanufacturing team expected to improve thanks to a hiring boost in the mainland as well as strong new orders in india. at the same time, china's new leadership, as we pointed out, has laid out some fresh directives. >> these are some pretty sweeping reforms making china's famously inefficient bureaucracy more efficient. it's an effort to "win the confidence and the support of the people" as public backlash rose against the special treatment of politicians. so a new list of dos and don't's for chinese leaders. on the do side, cut down on giving face. the art of extreme flattery or reverence, which results in some very long meetings and speeches. keep them short and cut down on the lavish feasts. he's also encouraging more travel to rural par
, adding about .1%. take a quick look at the bond space, the yield for spain and italy is moving higher today. but roughly as relevance we've seen predominating over the last couple of weeks. that is around 5.3% for spain. 4.5% for italy. we did see guilds moving about 3% level. now back below 1.9%. stick around because straight ahead, we get a view from one economist who says the weaker yen team is going to continue into the new year and offer some strategic calls. >>> as europeans get back to trading equities, let's get a sense of what we might see in the markets today. chris joins us from ibg group. chris, good morning. >> morning. >> we've seen a pretty quiet couple of days here. we've been talking about strength in the dax and whatnot. what's on your radar screen? >> as you say, it remains a fundamentally quiet day. unfortunately the fiscal cliff is dominating everything, really, what little traders are doing is being over-shadowed by the lack of movement, rather, in washington. >> and we've just heard allen capper who is with us talking about more volatility in the first quarter.
, and spain are just a few of the countries which have summoned israel's ambassador to express their concerns. there are warnings that new settlements in east jerusalem and the west bank could threaten the very viability of a two- state solution. >> israel's prime minister does not shirk controversy and is not afraid of upsetting his friends, but benjamin netanyahu might suddenly be feeling rather isolated. a number of european countries are upset over the thorny issue of settlements. for years, israel has been warned by allies that continued expense of israel's settlements on occupied jewish land is detrimental to a two-state solution. it was when israel signalled its intention to develop this strategically-important area known as e-1 that the row intensified. if this big piece of land was to become a jewish settlement, detractors say it would be the final nail in the coffin of the two-state solution. with dozens of jewish settlements already in the area, it is argued that developing e- 1 and his separation area around it, -- and this separation around it would cut off east jerusalem from th
was due to go to spain. he even call from hospital to say he could not go. his widow's lawyers said this meant he should have been protected. britain has been trying to improve relations with russia, but old wounds may now be reopened. >> there will be unusually stark and diplomatic fallout from this incident it was known when the papers were delivered and this would cause reaction, and perhaps even anger. >> was he killed on orders of the russian secret services? and was it because of his work for the british secret service tax -- service? >> it gets more and more mysterious. still to come, leaving his mark where it was not wanted. evangeline's a prison sentence after defiling a famous painting. >> ministers agreed on a fully fledged banking union and bailout loans for greece. what was being done to prevent another global downturn? that was on queen elizabeth's mind as she visited the bank of england. >> trying her hand at high finance, the queen, put in her signature on a special, a bank note. >> it does not improve much. >> the bank note, worth 1 million pounds, seem like small c
in italy, spain, and france proved especially wary. only britain bucked the trend with a rise in new car sales. a decade it has been since the inclusion of the german media empire. the state appellate court in munich today ruled that deutsche bank must pay damages to the heirs of the deceased mogul. >> the court ruled that the former ceo of deutsche bank, seen here, was responsible for the collapse of the world's largest licenser of film rights. in an interview, this credit worthiness was question, driving the conglomerate into bankruptcy. damages are expected to range anywhere from 120 million euros to 1.25 billion euros. it was also a big topic at the frankfurt stock exchange today. our market correspondent gave us this report from the trading floor. >> for the deutsche bank, this verdict is more than just a verdict because it weighs heavily on the image of germany's biggest bank. also because of the fact that the trial is not the only one that the deutsche bank is faced with, and some analysts are fearing now that investors might lose their confidence in dutch bank and sell their shar
an eye on it, it is falling a little bit. 1.95% after a soft set of uk retail sales figures. spain, italy, moving higher, but not too much of a move there. 5.3%. and 4.4 for italy. now, forex rates, the euro/dollar and the yen has been in focus still in the last several trading sessions and that continues today. 1.3230 is the level. the yen, though, is giving back about .5% after the bank of japan's quantitative easing plans, pretty much flecting a buy the rumor, sell the fact move. now, house republicans plan to bring their tax bill to a floor vote today. this as tensions over the white house over the fiscal cliff have started to rise. it's unclear what the bill, known as plan b, will look like. house speaker john boehner has reportedly added spending cuts to convince members it will be worth the vote. president obama has threatened to veto the bill. the president says he's puzzled by what's holding up budget talkes and that house republicans should stop trying to score a point against him. >> take the deal. you know, they will be able to claim that they have worked with me over the last
? >> thousands of people have been protesting in salvenia. >> and in spain activists are against an conviction law which strips people of their property but leaves to pay their mortgage payment in full. >> a spokesman said the sunshinery was successful and she's likely to go home in a few days. the 87-year-old was a prime minister. >> a human rights group questioned britain's alleged case of torture. they have agreed to pay $23 million to iraqi who is say they were illegal detained by british soldiers. but activists are demanding a public inquiry in all cases. >> an iraqi suspect is being interrogated by british soldiers. he tells them he's in pain. [beep] >> it's videos like this submitted to british courts that have helped force the u.k. government to make payouts of the payout over the space of three years. beatings, threat, sleep depravation, sexual humiliation say amount to systematic torture. >> you have to be very careful before you start embarking on anything that might turn into torture. the question is, of course, whether sleep depravation, whether food depravation, water depravation
is not fine. what beshould do is start a war with spain or france. if we go that everyone will rally to the flag. the south will come in. everybody wants to be beat up on the europeans. he doesn't say it idly. he tells the ambassador from spain and france that it's a deal. the question is what does lincoln want to do. lincoln doesn't think the south is bluffing. he has a problem. the north is not unified behind a war effort. maybe only a third of northern want to fight a war to keep the south in union. about a third are happy about it. we get rid of them. they are fine. let's get rid of the south. we don't have to -- let them go. about a third don't care. we don't want them to leave we don't want to fight for it either. lincoln does something clever. some people want to spend armed expedition to reinforce sumter. some want to sneak these troops in to reinforce them. and they want to give it up. lincoln doesn't do any of them. lincoln announces publicly that he's going send an e petition it's only going to have food and no weapons or ammunition. just food. he's forcing the decision to
nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was't famous until famous in the sense that we know historically now. so when he was running for president in the 17 nineties, he held in sulphide as the author of the declaration of independence. which in some ways he was. nobody even cared about that in the 1770s. but that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. he and john adams died on the same day. that is when the whole thing became a sainted document. it was god's handiwork that he -- that they died on the same day. >> would you have fit back in those days? >> up probably would have been a trouble maker -- i probably would have been a trouble maker. i probably also would have been somebody who had a strategic bent. i'm
to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempers and dead. -- so they made all these arguments. >> what did you think about jefferson? >> i did not think much. he was a words maturity was not a good governor of virginia. the british almost caught him one time. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was not famous until he was -- famous in the sense that we know him historical now -- until when he was running for president in the 17 nineties. he held himself out as the author of the declaration of independence, which in some ways he was. nobody had cared about that during 1770 s, but it helped him. that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. then when he and john adams died on the same day, july 4, 1826, and that's when the whole thing became the document that this was god's handiwork, but they died on the same day. >> knowing what you know ab
spain is $9. i drink a lot of that. >> this sounds like a law firm in barcelona. some of the most amazing sparkling wines and values come from spain and it's only $9. it's made like a champagne but doesn't cost lime one. >> how much is that? >> it's $12. it's absolutely a party in a bottle. >> if you go to italy, whether you're in rome or venice, you'll see literally everybody on new year's eve walking around with it. this is a very good one. >> and then a sparkling wine from australia. >> it's unusual. >> yeah. i've never heard of that. >> people think of australia gives us chardonnay and others. this is jacob's creek. ice made exactly like a champagne, chardonnay and pi pino noir, two of the grapes that go in champagne. but it's really remarkable. >> this is champagne? >> it's right next door to champagne. in france when they make wine in a sparkling wine type style, you can get this from burgundy. this one is made from pinot noir and chardonnay. it's aged like a champagne but doesn't cost like a champagne. this is only $17 an hour. this is my personal favorite. this is very fam
settlement construction. now, european nations including britain, spain, france, sweden, denmark, have all "summoned israeli ambassadors" to their capital cities in protest. officials say it is unlikely they will go through the more formal process of recalling their diplomats. david lee is live in jerusalem. how is israel's responding to this, david lee? >>reporter: a short time ago we talked to a source in the prime minister's office. he said and i quote, "the decision stands." what we talking about, and it is important we be clear, the 3,000 or so housing units you mention that would be in jerusalem as well as the west bank. israel, at the same time, made another decision saying in the planning stages, are another settlement expansion, this one in an area that the israelis identify as e1, 4 1/2 square miles outside of jerusalem and it is much more of a problem because the palestinians say if there is no construction in the area outside of jerusalem, they will not be able to have contiguous land and cannot have a palestinian state, and what they will be stuck with is, essentially, a crazy
and spanish fleet at trafalgar off the coast of spain. that triumph was marred by nelson's death from a sniper's bullet. the nation both celebrated his victory and mourned his death for years. nelson's column, built in trafalgar square, commemorated his sacrifice in stone and bronze. turner painted a highly original re-creation of the decisive moment that claimed lord nelson's life, setting it amid the crushing congestion of towering masts, torn sails and the fog of cannon fire at precariously close quarters. the reviews were good. (reader) "mr. turner... has detailed the death of his hero, while he has suggested the whole of a great naval victory, which we believe has never before been successfully accomplished, if it has been before attempted, in a single picture." (narrator) the napoleonic war ended in 1815 at waterloo. the duke of wellington had called the battle "a damn close run-thing." the fragility of civilization intrigued turner throughout his career. the decline of the carthaginian empire depicts the crushing penalty rome inflicted on the carthaginians. the architecture is elegant b
never happen. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. to the number 1 club in the world. the potential of manchester united unlocked. nyse euronext. unlocking the world's potential. introducing chase liquid. card hassles? the reloadable card that's easy to activate and can be used right away. plus, you can load cash or checks at any chase depositfriendly atm and checks right from your smartphone. get rid of prepaid problems. get chase liquid. >> greta: president obama refusing to budge. if that happen, will america's top earners leave the country? sounds extreme? that's what's happening in france. the socialist government imposing a 75% tax on numbers higher than 1 million e
of versailles soon cause the structure to crumble into the totalitarian moment. spain, of course with its civil war was the first to see the future. the fascist rose to power in italy, then germany, then a samara totalitarian culture in japan where a fascination await anyone who questioned the destiny of japan to all of asia, the remaining democracies in europe lacked the will to stop even the weakest of aggressors. when mussolini successfully crushed ethiopia, and none of the league of nations states oppose them, that's higher -- it was already dead. this of course was long before hitler invaded poland. a world war ii let me only but they say that what saved the world in our view was that the progressive liberal, new deal government of franklin d. roosevelt, most likely out of sheer desperation unleashed a productive power of free market capitalism to bury the acid towers in a tsunami of tanks, planes, and ships. anyone who's read my my books knows the statistics of pink slime just not far from where i teach, a tank was built from scratch in four and a half hours. henry kaiser's shipyard churn
] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. gerri: sandy will go down in history as one of the most costly hurrican of all ♪ gerri: insurance issues continued to crop up after super storm scene the ravaged the east coast a little more than a mon ago. reporting close a million losses among 150,000 business losses. if you have a settlement, there are a few crucial things you need to do first. joining me now, president of ericsson insuranceadvisers. welcome back to the show. great to have you here. when you talk to people, probably in an emtional state and probably not well prepared to deal with this kind of problem. what do you tell them ab
over the weekend. the ibex down over the weekend. so spain and portugal, seeing its index down over more than is % is showing its concern. joe, the ftse is at least holding up relatively better. it's down only .3% today. these losses follow a trading session that was setting up to be relatively strong. we saw asian stoxx doing decently well, so just kind of underscores how unhappy the market is this morning with this news out of italy. look at what's happening with debt. as we check in with bond markets, the italian tenure is seeing its yield rise. 4.88%. i know it doesn't seem that high, given some levels we were at last year. but if you consider that we've risen, i don't know, in the range of 30 to 40 basis points or .3 percentage points just on this news, it is pretty significant. spain, same thing, we're seeing 5.67 about the level there. other bond yields are benefiting as a result. back over to you guys. i'm sure carolin, too, can help us try to understand now what this all means with mario monti potentially still involved with the next eye toolan government. that may help rea
is going to lose. ♪ impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> we're back with tonight's outer circle, where we reach out to our sources around the world. as russia's president made a rare appearance in turkey today, to meet with the country's prime minister. they pulled nonessential staff from the area. clashes continue along the border of those two countries. ivan watson is is in istanbul and i asked him how close the latest syrian air strikes were to the turkish border. >> the air strikes hit within site of the turkish border, sending panicked civilians fleeing to the nearby turkish border, also sending warplanes in the air in response to these close air strikes.
that was in terrible shape to begin with and i think you have a lot of austerity fatigue going on spain, italy, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much
loans were exactly the same at 4% a year in the u.k., spain, and italy. today the four rates are very different. ours has fallen markedly. rates have come in a great deal. i was -- that was the first pillar. the second is that policy would provide the vehicle for accommodating the stimulus to the economy. fiscal policy would be a head wind in terms of the movement of total demand. monetary policy would be accommodative and more importantly, would accommodate the sharp fall in the sterling exchange rate which had taken place between the end of 2007 and the beginning of 2009. that was a 25% fall in the average effective exchange rates of sterling against other currencies. the biggest since the second world war. and the monetary policy was to make sure that that gain in competitiveness was retained by ensuring that domestically generated inflation would remain stable. these pillars were thought to be consistent with the gradual recovery of the economy. what happened was we did not get a gradual recovery. we saw output being broadly flat over the past 2.5 years. it has been a zigzag patte
in southeast spain is cleaning up after revelers battled it out with flour, eggs, and -- wait for it -- firecrackers. the annual flour/egg/firecracker fight takes place on december 28 and celebrates spain's equivalent of april fool's day. to recap, that is flour, eggs, and firecrackers. jud . >> do they combine? >> yeah, like bisquick a la requirecrackers. >> some story meetings -- >> maybe next year. >> maybe. we'll see. >> thanks. >>> dylan dreyer has a check of the national forecast. good morning. >> good morning to you guys. yeah, talking about snow in the northeast. rain in the southeast. and right smack dab in the middle of the country, >>> snow will continue coming east. expect your snow chance prior to noon today. after that, it's rain. all the precipitation ending about 3:00 today. take a look because some folks are saying, where's the snow? it's west of us now between now and 9:00. that line will come to the east. we will be getting some snowfall in here, but only for about three or four hours. amounts pretty light. an inch, maybe just over that in montgomery county.
translate. a town in southeast spain is cleaning up after revelers battled it out with flour, eggs, and -- wait for it -- firecrackers. the annual flour/egg/firecracker fight takes place on december 28 and celebrates spain's equivalent of april fool's day. to recap, that is flour, eggs, and firecrackers. jud . >> do they combine? >> yeah, like bisquick a la requirecrackers. >> some story meetings -- >> maybe next year. >> maybe. we'll see. >> thanks. >>> dylan dreyer has a check of the national forecast. good morning. >> good morning to you guys. yeah, talking about snow in the northeast. rain in the southeast. and right smack dab in the middle of the country, it looks nice and sunny. it will be cold. temperatures only in the 20s and 30s. we are looking again at most areas in the northeast around one to three inches. we're not talking about a lot of flag or a lot of wind -- flooding or a lot of wind. southeastern massachusetts will be a jackpot area where we could end up with about six to nine inches of snow. the southeast will see the rain mostly through this morning. it will be h
.3%. this at a time when the unemployment rate in spain is 26%, in france it is almost 11%, and across the whole eurozone it is almost 12%. employment, already at a record high, is set to go on rising each year of the forecast, and for every one job less in the public sector, two new jobs are expected to be created in the private sector. britain now has a greater proportion of its people in work than either the eurozone or the united states of america. mr. speaker, more jobs means that the impact of the weaker than forecast gdp on the public finances have been less than some might have expected. there have been three developments that have each had a significant one-off impact on the public finances, and in the report today we publish clearly and transparently the impacts of all three. first, there is the transfer of the royal mail pension fund to the public sector at part of its privatization. this produces a one-off reduction in the deficit of 28 billion pounds this year, but it adds to the deficit in the years afterwards. second, the previous goth had class -- government had classified northe
wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipperverage. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investmeninformation, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. stuart: all right everybody. let's talk california. it's been another banner year for the formerly golden state. voters approving carbon taxes on business. higher taxes on themselves. and the state overwhelmingly voted for the president in the election. more than 60% of the state voting in favor of president obama for his reelection. let's bring in our next guest. he is chairman of the republican party in california. i'm not being sarcastic but i didn't think the republicans existed in california any longer. you are their chairman, is that correct? >> it is. it was a rough year. stuart: what does 2013 hold in store for california? >> well, actua
production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses have led to an increase intands clinical depression. drug and alcohol abuse is up. and those dealing with grief don't have access to the professional help they need. when you see these issues, do you want to walk away or step up? with a degree in the field of counseling or psychology from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to make a difference in the lives of others. let's get started at capella.edu and the candidate's speech is in pieces all over the district. the writer's desktop and the coordinator's phone are working on a joke with local color. the secure cloud just received a revised intro from the strateg
, spain, great britain and mexico. they were found on the issue of slavery in the territory and southern nationalism. when you think about the jefferson-jackson party formation what they had was truly affect. bottled up along the eastern seaboard and they gained control over course of 50 years of the entire continent, the pacific. there is no possibility is that americans could settle that territory of the time. the the united states gained control of the arizona territory in 1846. it didn't become a state until 1914. the louisiana purchase the would begin to settle it in the 1850's when the slavery issue for the country apart. the republican regime orchestrated the industrialization of the nation based on the concept of economic liberty, the tariff and the gold standard. in 1865 the united states was an agricultural country about 30 million. when they were overthrown and was a highly industrialized country and probably the most prosperous country in the world. that wasn't six ackley known by americans at the time. >> i met the party platforms of the republican party and the democratic
disintegration during war, famine, and pestilence. it has happened in wales, portugal, spain, all over. we do not know why. we do not know what to do about it. i will give an answer that will interest and amuse the previous questioner. when two things coincided in late 18th-century england, a grain surplus, the result was a cheap gin and a social calamity. they passed a few laws, licensing laws, it did not help. what turned britain around was john wesley. methodism. converting the women of england -- [laughter] that is the way it worked. it is an odd thing for me to be saying. >> you talked about the virtues freedom requires. i worked in the field of education. if our major problem children come to school without virtues, it is the public school system the place to nurture that? i believe our society and culture does not nurture those virtues. how do we address that? >> this is a good question. the family is the smallest school. by the time all lots of negligently parented, often at no-fault to the single mother, these children get to school, and it is too late. the chicago schoolteacher it s
zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to "squawk box," everybody. in our headlines we're about an hour away from the november jobs report and the numbers are expected to be impacted by sandy. the dow jones forecast is calling for new 80,000 nonfarm jobs. >>> the reuters forecast is calling for 93,000 new jobs. >>> ibm is implementing a significant change to its benefit program. starting next year matching contributions to employees' 401(k) accounts will be given in one lump sum on december 31st. if a worker leaves the company before december 15th, they won't get anything from that payment. >>> also video game sales fell 11% in november from a year ago that's according to the new figur
in greece and spain. imagine what the minority unemployment would be if we had a 25% unemployment rate on average. we see pensions being cut without any notice at all. we see social price ramps slashed. so i would think if we can convince the representatives of the so-called disadvantaged groups that there is at least some probability that that will happen to us, i would say a certainty that will happen to us eventually if we don't do something about the situation, i would think there would be much more sober in their demands. but at this moment i don't see it. >> i would say, you know, that a lot of this is, you know, if we are talking inside the beltway, that is a different conversation of we go outside the beltway. part of the disservice that the debate is having today is that it is -- it is steering away from what the real issues are, the most pressing issue, which is the potential for a sovereign debt crisis and more optimistic. you know, steering the conversation away from that. and it is not helping ordinary americans understand what the threat is over a somewhat longer term. of
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